Heritage hero is reunited with its owner… 40 years on

January 25, 2017

A Ford Lotus Cortina belonging to the Ford of Britain heritage collection was reunited with its previous owner earlier this month, who sold it more than forty years ago.

 

02_Lotus-Cortina

 

Ford fan Rob Jones spotted the car watching ‘Car SOS’ on television, and recognised the registration – FGF 113C. A quick check of some old photographs confirmed his initial thoughts, that ‘his’ Lotus Cortina was now taking pride of place in the Ford heritage workshop.

 

Picture Credit: Spencer Griffiths

 

Rob contacted multimedia publisher, Motoring Research, having spotted ‘his’ car in their online feature gallery of the workshop, hoping they could help to reunite him with the car he sold for just £500 in 1976.

 

Earlier this month, on Rob’s 49th birthday, Ford invited him to see – and drive – the Lotus Cortina he once owned, and share stories with Ford’s heritage technicians about his days with the car.

 

Picture Credit: Spencer Griffiths

 

“I paid £370 for my Cortina, then I sold it for £500 eight months later. It’s just lovely. I remember that twin-cam sound – and the smell”, said Rob.

This particular car has been part of the Ford heritage collection for more than 20 years, with at least three previous owners since the 1970s – one of which was Rob.
He added: “Just being back behind the wheel felt special. I’d have another, definitely.”

 

Picture Credit: Spencer Griffiths

 

The Lotus Cortina was launched in 1963, two years before this particular model was built, when the founder of Lotus Cars, Colin Chapman, developed a 1.6-litre, four cylinder twin-cam version of the existing Ford engine, which produced 106bhp. Its merit on track was demonstrated by Jim Clark, who raced the Lotus Cortina in 1964 – winning the British Saloon Car Championship.

 

Here’s the full article, when Motoring Research’s Tim Pitt, together with Rob, headed to the Heritage workshop: http://ford.to/2jRoGdt

 

Picture Credit: Spencer Griffiths

 

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